Galicia is the land of rocky cliffs (the highest in mainland Europe) and unspoiled beaches (300km of them), as well as Spain’s best seafood, the World Heritage site of Santiago de Compostela, and surfing, hiking, and biking galore. The following pages contain information on rental properties near the fishing village of Cedeira, famous for its tapas bars and protected bay, and the historic town of Puentedeume, which sits at the mouth of the stunning river Eume. You will also find lots of information on the numerous activities, sights, and events on offer along Galicia’s northern shore, the Rías Altas.

 

Perhaps Spain's wildest and least developed coastline is to be found in the northwest, where the Autonomous Community of Galicia boasts no less than 1,659Km of coast, 800km of which is made up of cliffs and 300km by beaches. Much of the coast falls within the province of La Coruña, which stretches from Spain's northernmost point at Estaca de Bares to its northwestern tip, the infamous Costa de la Muerte. Granite ridges divide the northern coast into a series of valleys, which, flooded by rising sea levels during the last ice age, form what are known as the Rías Altas (the Upper Firths or Estuaries). As a result, this is a coastline of tremendous contrasts, with a seemingly endless choice of beaches (you can choose between Atlantic rollers and oak or chestnut-fringed coves - and yes, there are empty beaches even in August!). It is also home to one of the continent's best examples of Atlantic forest (in the curious microclimate on the near vertical banks of the river Eume), to mainland Europe’s highest sea-cliffs (the Herbeira cliffs measure 680m), and the oldest part of the Iberian Peninsula (a recent discovery suggests that Cabo Ortegal was formed 1,160 million years ago, making the Iberian Peninsula twice as old as previously thought). And inland, the province's hills, forests, and rivers are part of hiking and biking folklore the world over, thanks to the pilgrim's route to Santiago de Compostela, El Camino de Santiago. One of Spain's finest cities, Santiago is Galicia's capital and historic centre, and was named World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1985. There is a price to pay, however, for the region's seemingly perfect mix of picture-postcard green and crystalline blue; this is one of the wettest areas of Spain and many Spaniards would never consider risking their summer break on such an "unpredictable" coast. However, as with many of Galicia’s legends (this is also the land of ghosts and witches, or meigas) the region’s weather myth should at least be put into context: in the summer, temperatures average 3ºC more than in Cornwall, for example; and Cornwall gets 3 to 4 times as many days of rain. So, Galicia is cold and wet by Spanish summer standards, but...(!) Rocky coast and clear water is also the ideal ingredient for what is Spain's most sought-after shellfish. Lobsters, clams, spider crabs (the local favourite), cockles, and mussels can be found on menus all along the coast or, better still, prepared at home. Wash these down with one of Spain's best white wines (Albariños and Ribeiros from the south of Galicia) and shellfish will probably never taste quite the same again. If we were to tell you that you should also try the goose barnacles (percebes), that you will be served chips with everything (also the land of the potato), that you will play Russian roulette with mini green peppers (the wrong pimiento de padrón will blow your head off), and that you will burn your orujo-laced coffee in order to keep the witches away, you might not consider this your ideal culinary experience, but do not miss any of it; it is all Galicia at its best!

Below is also a video made at and around our property, Golmar 13:

 

Location Map

Properties Available in Galicia: introduction and rental properties

As Lobeiras

As Lobeiras

Beautifully restored barn in a typical Galician hamlet. This is northern Spain at its most authentic! Stone walls, high beamed ceilings...

Golmar 13

Golmar 13

Dating back to the beginning of the eighteenth century, Golmar 13, which has been restored respecting traditional methods and using local chestnut and stone,...